Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

This board is open for discussion on the Australian Yowie, Bigfoot, Yeti & Sasquatch. Please keep on topic in this forum.
User avatar
Shazzoir
Long Time Contributor
Posts: 1029
Joined: Sat Nov 19, 2005 12:40 pm
Position: Crypto Enthusiast
Gender: Female
Location: Brisbane, Qld

Re: Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

Unread post by Shazzoir » Thu Mar 15, 2018 7:44 am

I had no idea of the number of decapitated and mutilated bodies found in this country! Of course, I had heard of two relatively modern examples, but not any of these others, holy c**p! o-O I can't help think there is some veracity in thinking something a lot more powerful than a man may have had a hand in these terrible cases. This is a superb compilation, Paul, and a very thought provoking one too.

Shazz
Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. Dr. Carl Sagan

User avatar
Black
Silver Status
Posts: 157
Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 11:38 am
Position: Monk

Re: Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

Unread post by Black » Thu Mar 15, 2018 10:30 pm

We all know what you're alluding to, Paul.

I'm reluctant to jump to the same conclusion. We don't know enough of the backgrounds of each of the people. There may be other explanations to account for the people going missing and/or the state of their bodies when found.

User avatar
hillbilly
Gold Status - Frequent Poster
Posts: 255
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 11:35 am
Position: Believer
Location: Blue Mountains

Re: Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

Unread post by hillbilly » Sat Mar 17, 2018 8:51 am

I agree with Black. The missing person could have been a victim of evil human intentions. The victim could have gone into the bush to commit suicide. The victim could have done a really stupid thing and become fatally injured.
Or, .......they were killed by a Yowie.
Just thinking about the predation by wildlife on a dead human. Fully clothed, would mean that the face and neck would be the first easy meat. Hands are bony. Thus, the decapitation could be due to the ease of access to the neck, causing weakness in that area. Just a theory.
I think the biggest danger to humans, is other humans. And sometimes themselves. They can be an evil species :)

User avatar
paulmcleod67
Long Time Contributor
Posts: 709
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 3:28 pm
Facebook Profile Page: https://www.facebook.com/paul.mcleod.359
Location: Tivoli Queensland
Contact:

Re: Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

Unread post by paulmcleod67 » Sat Mar 17, 2018 10:38 am

Interesting historical articles...
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
Black
Silver Status
Posts: 157
Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 11:38 am
Position: Monk

Re: Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

Unread post by Black » Sat Mar 17, 2018 11:27 am

The first article strongly suggests the human remains were placed in the tree according to aboriginal burial rites of an Aboriginal tribe. It could also be that the aboriginal sought shelter inside the tree due to the elements perhaps, and died there.

As for the second story, it's strange, but its relying on the testimony of the one brother who returned home. It's also an initial story. I'm sure there were follow up articles. He could have knocked off his brother and concocted his story for the Police and newspaper. I wonder if the surviving brother eventually got charged?

User avatar
paulmcleod67
Long Time Contributor
Posts: 709
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 3:28 pm
Facebook Profile Page: https://www.facebook.com/paul.mcleod.359
Location: Tivoli Queensland
Contact:

Re: Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

Unread post by paulmcleod67 » Sat Mar 24, 2018 6:43 am

Black wrote:
Sat Mar 17, 2018 11:27 am
The first article strongly suggests the human remains were placed in the tree according to aboriginal burial rites of an Aboriginal tribe. It could also be that the aboriginal sought shelter inside the tree due to the elements perhaps, and died there.

As for the second story, it's strange, but its relying on the testimony of the one brother who returned home. It's also an initial story. I'm sure there were follow up articles. He could have knocked off his brother and concocted his story for the Police and newspaper. I wonder if the surviving brother eventually got charged?
I was referring to the oral tradition of the duligah and how aboriginal tree burial rites seem to reflect that tradition.

No other related articles on the missing brother have been thus located however I'm still looking.

User avatar
paulmcleod67
Long Time Contributor
Posts: 709
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 3:28 pm
Facebook Profile Page: https://www.facebook.com/paul.mcleod.359
Location: Tivoli Queensland
Contact:

Re: Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

Unread post by paulmcleod67 » Sat Mar 24, 2018 7:19 am

hillbilly wrote:
Sat Mar 17, 2018 8:51 am
I agree with Black. The missing person could have been a victim of evil human intentions. The victim could have gone into the bush to commit suicide. The victim could have done a really stupid thing and become fatally injured.
Or, .......they were killed by a Yowie.
Just thinking about the predation by wildlife on a dead human. Fully clothed, would mean that the face and neck would be the first easy meat. Hands are bony. Thus, the decapitation could be due to the ease of access to the neck, causing weakness in that area. Just a theory.
I think the biggest danger to humans, is other humans. And sometimes themselves. They can be an evil species :)
Clothing has little to do with stopping predation,teeth vs jeans?

Also...


User avatar
paulmcleod67
Long Time Contributor
Posts: 709
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 3:28 pm
Facebook Profile Page: https://www.facebook.com/paul.mcleod.359
Location: Tivoli Queensland
Contact:

Re: Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

Unread post by paulmcleod67 » Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:28 am

This was brought up in a private message so I wont mention the context for posting this without permission from the private poster. However upon looking into his concerns I came up with the following...

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... Brown.html
PUBLISHED: 17:05 AEDT, 23 July 2017 | UPDATED: 18:45 AEDT, 23 July 2017
tearful appeal to teenage daughter who vanished three days ago after walking to the bus stop with her brother
Jodie Binks-Brown, 13, vanished Friday morning from her home town of Romsey
The young teenager walked to bus stop with brother, returned home for shoes
The girl took backpack, bike and clothes, left a note saying she was going away
Victoria Police hold concerns for the young girl as she has no phone or money
Her mother, Lesley Brown, says 'it gets worse every hour she's gone'
By Hannah Moore and Emily Pidgeon For Daily Mail Australia
Jodie Binks-Brown, 13, (pictured) was last seen before 8am Friday morning when she walked to the school bus stop with her brother in Romsey, about an hour north of Melbourne, Victoria +4
Jodie Binks-Brown, 13, (pictured) was last seen before 8am Friday morning when she walked to the school bus stop with her brother in Romsey, about an hour north of Melbourne, Victoria
Distraught parents are fearing the worst for their daughter who vanished three days ago after walking to the school bus stop with her brother.
Jodie Binks-Brown, 13, was last seen before 8am on Friday morning when she walked to the school bus stop with her brother in Romsey, about an hour north of Melbourne.
Addressing the media on Sunday afternoon, Michael Binks and Lesley Brown shared their devastation at losing their little girl.
'It's getting worse, every hour she's gone,' Ms Brown told 7 News.
'There's a lot of not nice people out there, and that's a worry.'
Her father echoed the sentiment, saying going on without his daughter around is 'just hard - it's just not the same'.
Parents Michael Binks and Lesley Brown shared their devastation at losing their little girl on Sunday afternoon
At the bus stop, Jodie told her brother she'd forgotten her shoes and went home to get them, but did not return to catch the bus with her brother.
Her parents later discovered her clothes, back pack and bike were missing and a note had been left behind.
When asked what she would say to her daughter, Ms Brown looked into news cameras and said: 'We miss you badly, baby'.
Both Jodie's mother and father were crushed, as was her aunt (right). All three begged the 13-year-old to get in contact with one of them to say she was safe
Both Jodie's mother and father were crushed, as was her aunt (right). All three begged the 13-year-old to get in contact with one of them to say she was safe

The year 7 student was last seen wearing her school uniform including a navy blue t-shirt with red stripes, a navy blue rain coat with red stripes, navy blue tracksuit pants and white runners.
Victoria Police said Jodie's school bag was navy blue with white stars and she also took her Carlton Football Club back pack with 'JODIE B B' printed on it.
Jodie's bike is a metallic blue BMX with no mud guards.
Police are concerned for Jodie due to her young age and the fact she doesn't have a phone or money.
It is suspected she may have travelled to Kyneton, 35km north-west of Romsey.
Since vanishing, Jodie's family told News Corp they had discovered the young girl had been in contact with estranged relatives in the Seymour area, north-south of Romsey.


If the teenager has been located or I've missed anything I apologise
Cheers
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
paulmcleod67
Long Time Contributor
Posts: 709
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 3:28 pm
Facebook Profile Page: https://www.facebook.com/paul.mcleod.359
Location: Tivoli Queensland
Contact:

Re: Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

Unread post by paulmcleod67 » Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:36 am

Scratch last post. Thankfully she has been located safe and well.

http://www.news.com.au/national/victori ... 7df816f148

User avatar
paulmcleod67
Long Time Contributor
Posts: 709
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 3:28 pm
Facebook Profile Page: https://www.facebook.com/paul.mcleod.359
Location: Tivoli Queensland
Contact:

Re: Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

Unread post by paulmcleod67 » Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:45 am

And yet....

"
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-20/c ... ng/9569174

There are about 500 'John Does', or unidentified human remains, stored in morgues around Australia. And there are about 2000 long-term missing persons in Australia. There are calls for a national missing persons lab to help solve the cases.

User avatar
paulmcleod67
Long Time Contributor
Posts: 709
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 3:28 pm
Facebook Profile Page: https://www.facebook.com/paul.mcleod.359
Location: Tivoli Queensland
Contact:

Re: Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

Unread post by paulmcleod67 » Sat Mar 24, 2018 11:15 am

New case march 2018 forgive the early release on this case but my internal bells are ringing on this particular case.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
paulmcleod67
Long Time Contributor
Posts: 709
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 3:28 pm
Facebook Profile Page: https://www.facebook.com/paul.mcleod.359
Location: Tivoli Queensland
Contact:

Re: Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

Unread post by paulmcleod67 » Sat Mar 24, 2018 12:04 pm

I accidentally posted this in my research posts .
It does in fact belong here instead.

THE ALLISON BADEN CLAY CASE

Ive been sitting on this case since it began, however I feel now is the time to post the results of my investigation here.
I am expecting backlash and thats fair enough, I only ask that you consider ALL the details involved and distance your mind from the public outrage the case generated.
The reason for posting this here and now will be revealed in due course pending the outcome of an ongoing and very current case that is strikingly similar and in the same geographical region as the Baden Clay case.

Paul McLeod's GLOBAL MONSTER

8 months ago

Here are notes I took on the case that, to me made the whole affair seem a bit like a placation of the public outrage the case caused but based on a circumstantial case and supported only by the accused's plainly stupid change of story details. The defense plea change even seemed to have more tactical holes in it than swiss cheese.
The autopsy has got no cause of death but lists some pretty extensive post mortum predation by something that left no teeth marks?
Mrs Baden-Clay was reported missing by her husband on the morning of April 20 and her body was discovered 10 days later by a canoeist under the Kholo Creek Bridge.

Her body was found on May 1 in a creek bed at Anstead about 10 kilometers from the family's Brookfield home
"(Baden-Clay) gave evidence that he, his wife and their three daughters were at home on the night of April 19, 2012," it read.
"(Baden-Clay) said that he went to bed at about 10pm, leaving his wife in the living room; the next morning, she was not at home.
It was previously reported Mr Baden-Clay last saw his wife leave their home to go for a walk late on Thursday, April 19.

The screams

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-06-24/s ... wn/5545898

"Dr Flegg heard a 'female scream'
Dr Flegg also said on the night of April 19, 2012, he heard what he would describe as a female scream.
"I'm quite certain it was a female voice," he said.
"It was a single, reverse crescendo in volume, tapering off, and what I would describe as having an involuntary quality.
"[The scream] very strongly suggested a reduced level of consciousness."
Dr Flegg said he heard exactly the same sound about two to three minutes later.
He said he had no doubt about what he heard, but was not sure about how far away it was.
Dr Flegg said he was on the phone to Ms Heath when heard the scream, with his phone showing it to be 10:58pm.
"I said, 'did you hear that?'" he told the court.
Dr Flegg said he went out the front door to see if something was around his house.
"I heard nothing else that evening and that'd probably be the case most evenings," he said.
Under cross-examination, Dr Flegg said his house was at least one kilometre from the Baden-Clay home.
Dr Flegg told the court he "would be extremely surprised" if the noises he heard came from Baden-Clay home".

The car anomaly...

"... after the missing person's inquiry became a murder investigation, they narrowed the timeframe, suggesting one of the family cars, could have been on the move between 11.30pm on April 19 and 4am the following day"
But...

"Dr Flegg said he was on the phone to Ms Heath when heard the scream, with his phone showing it to be 10:58pm...Dr Flegg said he heard exactly the same sound about two to three minutes later.
Making the last reported scream to have accured at 11pm.
Thats a full thirty minutes before the reported movement of the family car still at the Baden Clay home.
Thats an anomaly and I would stipulate that this reported scream occurred during the course of Allisons alleged night walk in the area.

"He said that his wife often went for an early morning walk. He said that after a period of time, he attempted to contact his wife, went driving around the suburb looking for her, and finally called 000 to report her missing.
"Following (Allison's) disappearance, injuries to (Baden-Clay's) right cheek were examined. He said he cut himself shaving. Three experts gave evidence that one set of scratches was most likely caused by fingernails."
The Crown argued at trial that the fingernail marks on the accuseds face were evidence of a struggle and that Baden-Clay was under a lot of pressure from his mistress and financial issues with his real estate business when he murdered his wife.
In truth the only evidence used to convict Baden Clay were circumstantial inconsistencies in his own version of events , that he lied or omitted certain facts concerning his wife’s death and was convicted of murder in the first degree due to fairly anomalous but minor scratches to his own face and a small amount of blood found in the victims car.
None the less there are hard facts contained in the autopsy report that do not address how Allison died or how her body came to be 14 meters down an embankment and placed exactly under the bridge structure in deep and thick mud obscured from view and undiscovered for over a week

How did her husband achieve that physics defying miracle of time and space with no vehicle?
The post mortem autopsy report notes the following circumstances.

It was difficult to observe the body because it was UNDER the bridge
The body was laying on an inclined sloped embankment
Access to the body was difficult
14 meters below the bridge and directly under the bridge.
Police had to winch down from the bridge to access its location.
Access to the body was difficult being in thick mud which was hard to walk in.
The body had to be winched out of its location by police
No obvious fractures were noted
There is plant material on the body and in the hair
Two gold rings were on the bodies left forth fingers being consistent with wedding
band and an engagement ring as a set.
The body came to be were it was found within a short period of time following death
The body was subject to post mortem predation but no bite marks were evident (?)
This predation removed much of the face, the neck, the central upper chest, the intermammary region, the left shoulder and upper arm. much of the right fore arm and hand, part of the left hand ,the left thigh, parts of the pubic region, the left thigh and both ankles, the left tibia was thus also exposed by predation. ( her body was torn up under the bridge?)
All of the finger nails of the right hand are detached with two of the left hand finger nails were detached. (seems to be a lot of damage to her nails for such a small set of scratches on his face)
There is no evidence of suffocation or drowning.
There are no injuries consistent with rapid water action.
There is no signs of sexual assault
The cranium and jaw show no signs of trauma.
CT scans show no fractures.
A small chip off one of the bodies teeth may or may not be recent.
Evidence of a subdural hemorrhage may be due to decomposition rather than trauma.
Cause of death is undetermined So somehow between 11pm when screams are heard in the area and 1130pm (police stated times the vehicle was used) that night. The accused is supposed to have killed Allison some distance from her home whilst she was walking, (screaming heard) then carried her body ten kilometers away on foot and then down a steep muddy embankment and placed almost precisely underneath the bridge span (she was not dropped from the bridge) where he tore her body up. Amazingly he managed to make his escape back up the embankment all the while carrying away no forensic traces of the thick river mud on his person?
Can you see why I would red flag this case?

I did in fact locate Baden Clays autopsy report today...
https://aussiecriminals.files.wordpress ... eport1.pdf
Its quite interesting and sobering to read it in comparison to this media release...
http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensl ... ztr66.html

I don't buy the husbands guilt based only on his testimony as to how he got certain scratches on his person and the fact that he admitted to having a domestic argument with his wife prior to here being killed.
I think he witnessed what happened and it was so strange that for him to bring it into evidence his sanity would be questioned.
And of course, as is the case for most weird deaths in Australian bushland....no coronial report is released to the public.
In time the answers will come as long as the public remains unsatisfied with official tranperancy.

AN EXPECTED SKEPTICAL RESPONSE SAMPLE

Dean Herde
8 months ago
Paul McLeod's GLOBAL MONSTER so let me get this straight. You think he witnessed a Yowie kill his wife but he didn't want to say anything because his sanity would be called into question. If his sanity was called into question it would be a defense to a murder charge. So do you think he'd rather shut up and let them think he was sane, and a murderer, than to blame it on a Yowie and get off a murder charge due to insanity?
I'm not disputing the existence of Yowies as there are just so many reports of strange sightings by numerous people.
But I seriously am starting to question some of the things you are coming up with.

AFTER READING THE BRIEF

Dean Herde
8 months ago
Paul McLeod's GLOBAL MONSTER thanks for taking the time to respond the way you have. The long winded reply needs no apologies. Shows me that you believe in what you're doing and follow your convictions and I truly respect that. I read the autopsy report and thought that because of the lack of any injury to bones, and only soft tissue, that there was little chance of her having been killed by a large creature though. And Kholo Creek is tidal so the body could've floated to where it was found. Of course these are my assumptions from what I've read and I don't profess to know. Either way though, you have definitely presented some interesting points and looked far more deeply into this case than most others.
REFERENCES
http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensl ... ztr66.html
http://www.hcourt.gov.au/assets/cases/b ... lay_SP.pdf
https://aussiecriminals.files.wordpress ... eport1.pdf

ConvincedSkeptic
Approved Member
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Jun 21, 2015 1:31 pm

Re: Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

Unread post by ConvincedSkeptic » Wed Apr 25, 2018 2:35 pm

Interesting analysis of the Baden Clay case Paul.....
I too have been sceptical of this case for sometime. Though I don't necessarily believe Gerard is innocent nor Yowies are involved it is a very unusual case. There's a brilliant book by David Murray on Baden-Clay that highlights a few other strange coincidences of the case. Namely the report that on the night of Baden Clay's murder a dog on a nearby property went berserk at a patch of bushland before proceeding to stare obsessively at it for the following week. Strangely enough this spot was directly in line with where the body was found.
I can see the argument of how foolish it would be to be to not claim insanity over admission to murder however Gerard seemed to be a very considered and methodical man. For arguments sake- lets say he saw "something" murder his wife and maybe even struggled with it a bit himself - hence the fingernail marks. Isn't it at all possible he could've gone into an almost catatonic state of over rationalisation with what happened?
There's more I'd love to discuss with you on the matter Paul if you'd be up for some emailing- you certainly spiked my curiosity!

User avatar
paulmcleod67
Long Time Contributor
Posts: 709
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 3:28 pm
Facebook Profile Page: https://www.facebook.com/paul.mcleod.359
Location: Tivoli Queensland
Contact:

Re: Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

Unread post by paulmcleod67 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 4:18 pm

ConvincedSkeptic wrote:
Wed Apr 25, 2018 2:35 pm
Interesting analysis of the Baden Clay case Paul.....
I too have been sceptical of this case for sometime. Though I don't necessarily believe Gerard is innocent nor Yowies are involved it is a very unusual case. There's a brilliant book by David Murray on Baden-Clay that highlights a few other strange coincidences of the case. Namely the report that on the night of Baden Clay's murder a dog on a nearby property went berserk at a patch of bushland before proceeding to stare obsessively at it for the following week. Strangely enough this spot was directly in line with where the body was found.
I can see the argument of how foolish it would be to be to not claim insanity over admission to murder however Gerard seemed to be a very considered and methodical man. For arguments sake- lets say he saw "something" murder his wife and maybe even struggled with it a bit himself - hence the fingernail marks. Isn't it at all possible he could've gone into an almost catatonic state of over rationalisation with what happened?
There's more I'd love to discuss with you on the matter Paul if you'd be up for some emailing- you certainly spiked my curiosity!
Ironicly, as promised above, here is the recent case that for me mirrors in many ways circumstances surrounding the Baden Clay murder...This is the current media drift on the case, the nuts and bolts, public outrage stuff they love so much. My gut says there is far more to it all, as the case is stamped with the atypical cryptic coment of... "Police have never released the cause of death..." , bullshit that makes my spidey sense tingle...Read on Mcduff... and make sure you check out the image showing where her body was found....cough....cough...BULLSHIT....cough...

http://www.news.com.au/national/victori ... efe8eab1a1

Karen Ristevski’s husband charged with murder
THE brother of Melbourne fashion identity Karen Ristevski says it has been an “emotional day” after his sister’s husband Borce was charged her murder.
Steve Williams released the statement after Mr Ristevski fronted court this morning.
“Today has been a surprisingly emotional day - one in which I have been patiently waiting for,” the statement said.
“It is in no way a celebration, it’s another stage in bringing my beautiful sister Karen the justice she so deserves.”
Dressed in a white T-shirt and sporting a thick beard, Mr Ristevski, 53, spoke just one word during an appearance at Melbourne Magistrates’ Court that lasted a total of four minutes.
Asked if he had had the opportunity to speak with his lawyer Rob Stary this morning, Mr Ristevski answered “yes”.
His lawyer Rob Stary indicated his client would be pleading not guilty. He made no application for bail and was remanded in custody to reappear on April 18.
Prosecutors have been granted extra time to prepare their case because of the complex nature of the investigation, according to the Herald Sun.
Mr Ristevski was arrested at 7.20am by detectives from the Missing Persons Squad, a Victoria Police spokesman said.
His 47-year-old wife went missing from the couple’s $1.1 million Oakley Drive, Avondale Heights mansion on the morning on June 29, 2016.
Mr Ristevski has told police she went for a walk to “clear her head” following a minor argument about money but never returned. He reported her missing the next day.
Her remains were found wedged between two logs off a walking trail at Mount Macedon in Melbourne’s north west on February 20. Police have never released the cause of death.
...Ms Ristevski’s body was found in bushland in the Mount Macedon Regional Park — 50km from her home — on February 20.
Police finally broke their silence on Mr Ristevski’s status in June, with Inspector Tim Day declaring: “Yes he is a suspect, I won’t go into if there are others. What makes him a suspect I’ll leave others to judge why.”
Mr Ristevski has been interviewed by police several times and has strenuously denied any wrongdoing.
The 52-year-old has told police the last time he saw his wife was around 10am on June 29, 2016, when she left their Avondale Heights home to clear her head after the pair argued about money.
Police later traced pings from the couple’s mobile phones to transmitter towers along Melbourne’s Calder Highway on the day of her disappearance. Ms Ristevski’s mobile phone was reportedly tracked near Gisborne, 40km northwest of the family home...
...In June, police released footage of a black Mercedes-Benz SLK coupe, the same car model as Ms Ristevski’s, driving northwest along Old Calder Highway.
The grainy video shows the vehicle driving over a railway crossing in the northwest Melbourne suburb of Diggers Rest at 11.12am on the day she disappeared...'

So that's the basic media on the story. I will continue this when I can obtain the coronial findings or a copy of the actual police or autopsy reports. Pretty horrible and tragic stuff that I take no pleasure in following....but sadly it's part of my research brief on this topic.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
paulmcleod67
Long Time Contributor
Posts: 709
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 3:28 pm
Facebook Profile Page: https://www.facebook.com/paul.mcleod.359
Location: Tivoli Queensland
Contact:

Re: Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

Unread post by paulmcleod67 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 4:34 pm

Incidentally or again Ironically the Romsey case shows a clearer picture of incidents around Mount Macedon.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
paulmcleod67
Long Time Contributor
Posts: 709
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 3:28 pm
Facebook Profile Page: https://www.facebook.com/paul.mcleod.359
Location: Tivoli Queensland
Contact:

Re: Long Term Missing Person's, recovered Human remains & Yowies

Unread post by paulmcleod67 » Thu May 10, 2018 2:42 am

MISSING PERSONS CASES FROM 1951 COMPARED TO THOSE OF 2017
I located a very interesting newspaper article on TROVE written in 1951 concerning missing persons cases of that time. What I found shocking was not the article in and of itself, but in the direct comparison to an official release of missing persons data from 2017.
I added a direct statistical comparison of the 1951 data to the 2017 data at the bottopm of this post. I'm certain you will be just as shocked by the numbers as I was.
The Courier-Mail Brisbane Thu 6 Dec 1951
PEOPLE ARE 'DISAPPEARING' AT THE RATE OF 100 A MONTH
The 'Missing Person'is a maior police problem today
by
P. D. LLOYD, a Courier-Mail Police Reporter
Queensland Police are being inundated with "Missing Person" inquiries at the rate of 100 a month. Today this phase of police work has mush-roomed into one of their biggest jobs. Last year's total of persons reported missing was more than 1200.
Indications are that the total this year will be even greater.
Police find that many"Missing Persons" have some medical history. They blame nervous complaints for the greater proportion of genuine disappearances. Amnesia, alcoholism, domestic upsets, and general worry about employment, school examinations, and love affairs have all contributed to the spiralling rise in sudden disappearances.
Every day the police radio station broadcasts dozens of messages, and every day included in them are several describing missing persons. As the impersonal voice of the radio operator infiltrates Despite the anxiety and worry for relatives and friends, police officials say that less than one per cent of missing person cases have any sinister aspects.
Amnesia, alcoholism, domestic upsets, school examinations, and frustrated love affairs have all played their part in the rise in sudden disappearances. Whatever the cause, the police search never ends until the mystery is finally solved. receivers in patrol cars, and city and suburban police stations, other police are carefully recording every word.
A few minutes later hundreds of police are watching for the missing man, woman,or child. Next morning the full description will be specially printed on a C.I.B. circular, and posted to every district station in Queensland. If the case is thought to be a routine one, only one particular policeman will get the file for personal attention. Usually, in the case of a missing female, policewomen will help in the search. Within two days the full missing person search routine will be completed, and more than 2000 police will be on thc lookout throughout Queensland. Sometimes a missing person will return home voluntarily after only a few hours' absence. Sometimes police find them after a few days. Sometimes they are never seen again.
MANY missing person inquiries fizzle out. Police, therefore, are wary if starting an inquiry without first satisfying themselves that the case is a genuine one. Despite this, they find that 90 per cent, of the cases they investigate are false.
The 'missing' person had just missed transport home, had a few drinks and been delayed, or felt 'browned off' and deliberately gone into 'smoke' for a day or two. But the other 10 per cent,of cases really keep police busy. These are the people suffering nerve disorders, the would-be suicides, and the young girls whose very innocence makes them an easy mark for unscrupulous men.
Late every night city police stations get many calls from anxious mothers whose daughters have not arrived home from a dance or picture theatre.Police are used to these calls and have a routine way of handling them.
First a check is made with ambulance and hospital authoritics. If there is no record of the girl having been involved in an accident this information is passed to the mother. Then, if police are satisfied there is not yet enough evidence to justify belief that the girl is really 'missing,' the mother is told to wait another hour or so, then ring back if her daughter has not returned.
In 99 cases out of 100, the second call never comes. The girl usually returns home with a quite simple explanation of her absence. Some not so simple BUT other cases that have such a simple beginning do not end as happily.Some missing persons commit suicide. Others reported missing are frequently found as victims of accidents, sometimes in city streets, sometimes in remote bushland areas.
Many wives institute missing person inquiries to find husbands who have deserted them. They are usually interested mainly in maintenance.
Chief Inspector Harold says that less than one percent, of missing person cases have any sinister aspects. When police do suspect foul play, however, the resultant search and inquiries can cost thousands of pounds, disorganise whole country centres, and claim lives of searchers.
That is why police closely screen all the information available before setting in motion the search routine.
The Norval case
ONE such search was that for Brisbane typist, Marjorie Norval, still an unsolved mystery.
Here is what happened in that search in 1938 :The search cost thousands of pounds and more than 1000 people were interviewed. The police of the entire Commonwealth, including the Northern Territory, and the New Zealand police searched at the request of the Brisbane C.I.B.
A complete check-up was made on burials within a radius of 50 miles. All cremations were checked. Police made sure that not more than one corpse had been buried in one coffin, and that there had been no subsequent burials in one grave. The bush was searched for miles, costing four lives when a plane crashed near Beenleigh.
Every newly disturbed piece of earth for miles around Brisbane was dug up, and dead horses, cows, dogs, and other animals were unearthed. Yet the search failed.
Throughout Queensland tonight about 100 families will sit down to dinner, with one empty space at the table. A husband, wife, son, or daughter has vanished, and the incident will prey on the minds of the whole family until police finally contact them to advise of the missing person's location.
Many intriguing cases are "open" in police files today. Routine inquiries having failed police have sought public co-operation by having descriptions and photographs printed in the Press.
Take the case of Brisbane accountant, Joseph James Rose, 40.
One Saturday last July Rose walked from his office, Adelaide House, and since then has not been seen. An Australia-wide search has given police no lead whatever on his where abouts.
Then there is the case of Brisbane P.M.G. telephonist, 16-year-old Margaret June Veneris. She left her grandmother's home in Vernon Street, Nundah, on July 19, and vanished. She was happy in her job, and a home-loving girl. Her case has veteran police and policewomen mystified. A bundle of clothing found on the Story Bridge on October 13 started police on a hunt for William John Anderson, 26, of Marburg. In a good position in an Ipswich business, Anderson just did not show up for work one Saturday morning, and has not been seen since.
These are just three of numerous cases on file. Perhaps these three peoole will be located within a few days, perhaps never.
Police will continue searching for them for years if necessary until the mysteries are finally solved.
SOURCE: TROVE
https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/arti ... at=Article

COMPARATIVE ARTICLE ON MISSING PERSONS RELEASED IN 2017
Monday, 31 July 2017, Publish time: 8:21am
This is a joint media release issued by the Australian Federal Police and Queensland Police.
The Australian Federal Police and the Queensland Police Service today launch National Missing Persons Week for 2017, with a specific focus on the 25,000 young people reported missing to police each year across Australia. More than 38,000 people are reported missing each year, with two thirds under the age of 18. While the majority of missing persons are found within a short period of time, there remain more than 2000 people who are listed as long-term missing persons; people who have been missing for more than three months.
AFP Commissioner Andrew Colvin said for every missing person there are family, friends and colleagues left behind, still waiting for them to come home.
“We could fill the GABBA today with the number of people reported missing to police in Australia every year,” Commissioner Colvin said.
“ … And for every missing person, there are families and friends left behind not knowing what has happened to someone they care deeply about.”
Young people may go missing for a range of reasons, including miscommunication, misadventure, or because of a misunderstanding. In some circumstances going missing may be seen as the only option to leave a bad situation, and in the most extreme of cases, a young person may have become a victim of crime.
Those aged between 13 and 17 are six times more likely to go missing than the rest of the Australian population.
Queensland Police Service Acting Deputy Commissioner (Specialist Operations) Tracy Linford said this year the focus through the campaign “Still waiting for you to come home” would be on the high number of youth that were reported missing each year.
“Today is the appropriate day to announce the QPS Snapchat capability where the demographics in Australia are largely in the 18 to 25-year-old age group so it enables us to send information and images to these people,” Acting Deputy Commissioner Linford said.
“It additionally broadens the current social media reach the Queensland Police Service has to further share information about missing people.
“On average, around 100 people are reported missing to police every week in Queensland. We as a police service do all we can to help families find their loved ones, so this is a logical extension to our already large reach in the social media sphere.”
While most people are found within a short period of time, there remain approximately 1,600 long term missing persons; those who have been missing for more than three months.The rate of missing person reports equates to approximately one person every 15 minutes. The rate of missing persons in Australia is 1.7 per 1,000 people. On average, around 100 people are reported missing to police every week in Queensland
There is no need to wait 24 hours to report someone missing. A report can be made as soon as there are fears for the person’s welfare and safety, and their whereabouts are unknown.
Going missing is not a crime. People reported missing and subsequently located by the police will not be charged. If you are a missing person, today might be the day where you let your family and friends know you are OK.
National Missing Persons Week is supported by Outdoor Media Association, Chemist Warehouse and McDonald’s Australia.
To view Australia’s national register of missing persons, visit the National Missing Persons Coordination Centre website at www.missingpersons.gov.au, where information about support services across Australia can also be found.
Anyone with information relating to a missing person is urged to contact their local police or Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.
Media enquiries:
AFP National Media: (02) 6131 6333
Queensland Police Media: (07) 3015 2444
SOURCE:
https://www.afp.gov.au/news-media/media ... rsons-week
COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS
1951:
"Queensland Police are being inundated with "Missing Person" inquiries at the rate of 100 a month. Today this phase of police work has mushroomed into one of their biggest jobs. Last year's total of persons reported missing was more than 1200".
2017:
“On average, around 100 people are reported missing to police every week in Queensland' More than 38,000 people are reported missing each year .The Australian Federal Police and the Queensland Police Service today launch National Missing Persons Week for 2017, with a specific focus on the 25,000 young people reported missing to police each year across Australia.
1951:
MANY missing person inquiries fizzle out. Police, therefore, are wary if starting an inquiry without first satisfying themselves that the case is a genuine one. Despite this, they find that 90 per cent, of the cases they investigate are false.
2017:
The national rate of missing person reports equates to approximately one person every 15 minutes. The rate of missing persons in Australia is 1.7 per 1,000 people".
Per capita population variables...
Australia's population in 2016 was 24,127,200 people.
Australia's population in 1951 was 8,421,775

Post Reply