tree bending

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Shazzoir
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Re: tree bending

Unread post by Shazzoir » Tue Jun 12, 2018 6:23 pm

missm4mi wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 8:28 pm
thank you all for your comments, ideas and opinions. found some more bends today (3 more). the area I am finding all these unusual "signs" is on top of the mountain ridge in a corridor of thick dry forest. to the south of this area, the toowoomba second range crossing project is currently underway. lots of land cleared and heavy machine activity for the last two years. to the north of this area more land is currently being cleared and logged. Another walk in this central dry forest corridor on the opposite mountain ridge I am finding NO tree bends. however there are bones of kangaroos, sheep, goats and cattle literally everywhere.
Missm4mi has pointed out some rather useful information here, but nobody as yet has said too much about it, so I will. Let's break it down into facts - please correct me if I have interpreted your words incorrectly.

1. The Toowoomba range crossing project is underway to the south of this 'corridor' area where the tree bends are, with lots of land clearing and machinery in use for the last two years.
2. This is being replicated to the north, but is in the early stages, compared to the south.
3. The 'corridor' she has walked is between the two areas, on top of a mountain ridge.
4. The opposite hill 'corridor' has no tree bends (but lots of bones).

Might this give us three options to explain the trees that are bent over?
a) The trees have bent naturally, due to some or mixed phenomena, such as weather conditions having changed in less protected areas (i.e. blown about by wind, dehydration [as mentioned previously], or via some other provocation.
b) The trees have been bent into arcs intentionally, either by human agency (bored tradies perhaps?) or
c) Non-human (let's say Yowie/Yowies) agencies.

Let's extrapolate a little, given that we have no real idea if tree bends can be attributed to Yowies, so this is just pie-in-the-sky thinking.

If a), how come the trees in one ridge area have been bent, yet the other ridge opposite has no bent trees of similar appearance?
Might that indicate it isn't/wasn't a weather condition or some kind of insect weakening the trunks (borers, beetle larvae etc.), or dehydration? It might be reasonable to make the assumption then, that these conditions couldn't vary too much in such a small localised area (I'm saying within a couple of km of each other)? Is there the possibility that the trees were bent by some other means?

Let's look at the human aspect option first... The south of corridor area has been subject to logging, felling, and intrusion by heavy machinery, so it's logical that humans bored at lunchtime or whatever, may have had two years to fool around with the remaining trees, saplings, mostly, to bend them down (why, I have no idea). I would think that unless the trunks were held down for some time with rope or similar, the saplings would simply go back to their former erect habit, possibly with a little bend, if enough damage was done to the trunk structure. Have any signs of rope or twine or such been found in the area? Are there any rub or abrasion marks on the tops of the bent trees that might indicate a long-term tie-down may have resulted?

Humans are fond of trying to change their environment in some way for some reason (just look at all the examples of people carving their initials in trees and whatnot) and rock stacking is also another fairly common way for a person to 'leave their mark', given that rocks aren't considered 'flora', and are unharmed by stacking on top of each other. I'm of the belief that some rock stacks do serve as cairns to signify something to both humans in the bush, and Yowies. Artistic intent aside, it's a simple system of marking boundaries that goes back millennia, all over the world. I'm not good enough to be able to tell if a person stacked those three rocks, or something else with opposable thumbs and a hankering to show territory, did. But back to the trees...

That picture of the tall, thin sapling with the still green canopy is interesting to me, simply because it appears to have been drawn down, the the canopy part fixed in place with other trees and branches. This is NOT something nature would or could do, which leaves the human-Yowie aspect.

Now, if the south side of the corridor has been subjected to human desolation via machinery for two years, might it be reasonable to assume if humans didn't do it, that something else did, with clear intent to send a message? While it has been said, and I paraphrase, "Why would Yowies bother doing this to so many trees? They are more subtle than that."

Yes, they probably are. The majority of humans, however, (and forgive me for generalising) are dumb as a box of hammers when you take them out of their suburban/rural environment, and plonk them in the bush. We can't see the details, have no advanced sense of smell to detect possible animal/Yowie scent markings, or even observe scat, and half the time are too busy lumbering around the place trying not to fall over something in the natural landscape, to notice such details. Forget then, us being able to spot the minutiae of far more subtle markings such as sticks shoved part way into the earth, small trees pulled together to form a visual barrier, with the greater intent probably being much more obvious to those who know or guess what they might be looking at, logs dragged over pathways, or one or two subtle trees pulled down into an unnaturally low arch, to indicate a barrier.... so what's stopping a Yowie or group of them, giving up on subtlety in utter exasperation, because the stupid noisy, clueless humans AREN'T GETTING THE MESSAGE THAT THEIR DAMAGE AND DESTRUCTION AND PRESENCE IS NOT WELCOME? Throw 'subtle' out the window, and just go to town, making dozens of these visually different arches with living trees in hopes we'll twig? (pun intended)

So, what about the north ridge area, with no apparent tree bends... ? Maybe the Yowies have just given up on us as a lost cause, given that multiple trees bent over on the south side have achieved nothing. Who knows? Maybe they've decided to move house, and have simply vacated the premises, after such a drawn-out period of destruction has gone ahead despite their best efforts to show someone else lives or hunts here, because we just don't register what we are looking at, and write it off as 'climate' or 'weather anomalies' and so on.

What I'm saying, is that if you consider the big picture from as many aspects as you can dream up (and that's why I love this place because the forum gives us all the exact opportunity to do just that), you still may not have all the information to allow you to make a judgement call on how something came to be. We're all looking for answers, but may not even have the questions right.

What would be brilliant is to have someone who is working on the Range Crossing and who has an open mind, to tell us if they have seen, heard, smelled or sensed anything odd during their time there. I will bet my bottom dollar, that there have been animal sightings of all kind, and perhaps even of creatures that people couldn't identify, either from ignorance or because it did their head in to try to explain something that made no sense or which they couldn't compare to any known creature that belongs in the Aussie bush.

Anyway, thanks for posting Missm4mi, I don't want to write any of your observations off, and do wish to keep an open mind. I believe that when there isn't a rational explanation for something, then you have to consider the world holds far more than we probably can comprehend, let alone see.

Shazz
Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. Dr. Carl Sagan

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:10 pm

great contribution shazz. thank you. the second range is two ridges south. so it goes ridge with tree bends. then wide valley. then another "untouched" ridge. wide valley. then next ridge which is where the second range crossing project crossing is located. so as for bored workers in their lunch break doing anything I highly doubt it as they would have a great distance to travel to access the tree bend area. as the crow flies - only a few kilometres but by road which turns into a 4wd track/trail access would take them 30 minutes or more to get there. I do personally know some people who work on the second range crossing and have been told a large cave has been located. the area is fenced off completely, and has been recognized as an area of indigenous cultural significance. it is a no go zone and off limits to everyone.

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:56 pm

today I went walking with another family member and their dog. (won't go alone anymore). dog sniffing and exploring in all directions along where I walk the area with the tree bends (I will call this ZONE ONE). followed the dog some distance off the main trail. the following photos are what we observed:
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was getting dark quickly got out of there and returned home. wouldn't of discovered these structures and remains if we did not have the dog with us.
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Simon M
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Re: tree bending

Unread post by Simon M » Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:01 am

That's a good point, and I agree. Apart from the obvious fakes (like that Yowie Claw video), I think 99.9% of researchers in this country are sincere.

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Searcher
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Re: tree bending

Unread post by Searcher » Wed Jun 13, 2018 9:41 am

Nice report, missm4mi.

As for the bones, don't forget the possibility of the big cat scenario. There continues to be widespread sightings in the Australian bush... and these fierce predators love to eat meat. :D

I personally have family, best mates and close friends who have shared their experiences with these elusive animals.

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by inthedark » Thu Jun 14, 2018 11:32 am

Just wanted to add that wind squalls can be incredibly isolated -- even down to metres. If you have separation of a valley, even a small or narrow valley, wind becomes even more likely a culprit. One flank (of a hill) can experience quite different conditions to the next flank. Add in differing moisture conditions from one ridge to the next, and different tree pests, etc etc etc etc, and almost any tree anomaly can be understood. Teepees being the obvious exception.

Still, it's fun to speculate while out walking .. assuming it doesn't terrify! I don't let myself think about it too much, since I'm usually in the bush in pitch darkness. Headlamps only go so far, and are no help at all in a blind panic run (eek)

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by inthedark » Thu Jun 14, 2018 11:34 am

Searcher wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 9:41 am
Nice report, missm4mi.

As for the bones, don't forget the possibility of the big cat scenario. There continues to be widespread sightings in the Australian bush... and these fierce predators love to eat meat. :D

I personally have family, best mates and close friends who have shared their experiences with these elusive animals.
Most are likely natural attrition (death by natural causes .. old age, disease) or dingoes/feral dogs.

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Sun Jun 17, 2018 1:29 am

I went back to the place where we found the upside down tree wedged into another tree on top of the mountain ridge. (felt safer in daylight hours) was able to get a photo where it fitted all into the one shot. The "A" structure at the bottom - made by another large stick stuck into the structure. very bizarre. The trees are very tall and would be extremely heavy.
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missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Sun Jun 17, 2018 1:38 am

in my previous posts I have referred to the trees that have been bent as "saplings" - when I think more about it I should of called them trees as most of them are a good couple of inches in circumference with the wood being very dense and solid.

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Wed Jun 20, 2018 2:57 am

observations from today's walk:

found a number of new and fresh tree bends. most of them were secured to the ground with sticks or interwoven onto other trees at ground level.

one looks like a makeshift shelter.

also heard casual bi-pedal footsteps in an area where I have heard other strange noises previously. It was just on dark. I was outta there as quickly as possible.
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paulmcleod67

Re: tree bending

Unread post by paulmcleod67 » Wed Jun 20, 2018 6:56 pm

Interesting images.
As a pre teen adolecent living in the newly built swanky housing commision suburb of 1978's Minto (home of the Minto monster)
myself and my phone box robbing mates used to wander deep into the local bushland around Lumea, and on to tributaries of the mighty Georges river, we would hunt red belly black snakes with rebar we pinched during the construction of the now demolished Minto mall or we would play pirate ships on boxed sections of the aforementioned construction sites galvo air ducts, floated on a local farms cattle dams. We had another pass time called giddy yup. This involved climbing up the trunks of tall slender saplings until they bent under the weight of our 1970's punny bodies. The goal was to stay on the trunk until it slowly bowed and gently lowered us to the ground. More often than not, the tall sapplings remained bent over in an arch until they dried that way permanently. We stopped that game forever one day when a local chicken farmer shot my mate Bernie with a .22 when he was up one of those trunks.

Just a thought
Cheers

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Thu Jun 21, 2018 1:31 am

I really have no idea with the tree bends - the area is isolated and on top of a mountain ridge and not frequented by people all that often. the tree bends which are virtually popping up overnight are puzzling. I have travelled and camped in QLD, NT, SA, VIC and NSW and have not seen anything like what I am seeing now. I can go walking and count 20 or more of these bended/woven/secured structures which have appeared recently with more being observed each time I go into this particular area (eastern side of toowoomba range). I have a very strong feeling that it's not humans doing this. the super-sized tepee is certainly beyond the strength capacity of any human and the upside down tree wedged into another tree - definitely not human. to be honest going into the forest and bending a tree is not something that has ever crossed my mind as something just to go and do. ..

also observed early in the morning at daybreak (twice now), I am seeing what I guess to be wallabies entrails. I see a few tufts of fur, no sign of blood or any other part of the animal except for the clean looking entrails left on the ground, like the animal has been butchered in some way. all a bit out of the ordinary.

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Thu Jun 21, 2018 1:52 am

soon I think I will walk down at the local park or sporting oval as I am feeling uneasy and anxious walking the mountain ridge. the ridge is a gorgeous and spectacular place. however if I am walking there in the late afternoon I feel spooked and like I have to get out of there pretty quick.

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Sat Jun 23, 2018 11:41 pm

came across a YouTube video regarding tree bends:

having trouble sharing a link.

YouTube video is titled - YOWIE ROAD SIGNS
by Brett young.

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by ripperton » Sun Jun 24, 2018 6:14 am

missm4mi wrote:
Thu Jun 21, 2018 1:52 am
soon I think I will walk down at the local park or sporting oval as I am feeling uneasy and anxious walking the mountain ridge. the ridge is a gorgeous and spectacular place. however if I am walking there in the late afternoon I feel spooked and like I have to get out of there pretty quick.
Take some mango's with you next time. Charm them. Get on their good side.

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by Yowie bait » Sun Jun 24, 2018 7:37 am

Good point by Ripperton. Leave something when you start your walk. Its better than doing nothing if you continue to walk there and you think its them. Probably sick of the constant development down there. Personally, i would stay away and walk somewhere else!
Yowie Bait

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Wed Jun 27, 2018 3:07 pm

most recent photos
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missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Sat Jul 07, 2018 5:06 pm

OMG! OMG! OMG! something large and brown just ran across the trail in front of the 4WD. about 40 metre's in front of us. steep terrain. in the place where I have heard the tree knocks and seen the tree bends. travelling at a great speed -too fast to get a good look. TIME TO GET OUT OF THE FOREST!!!

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Sun Jul 08, 2018 2:48 am

unusual looking footprint - 16 inches long. the soil type is hard/sandstone. had a bit of rain the day prior.
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Shazzoir
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Re: tree bending

Unread post by Shazzoir » Sun Jul 08, 2018 10:41 am

missm4mi wrote:
Sat Jul 07, 2018 5:06 pm
OMG! OMG! OMG! something large and brown just ran across the trail in front of the 4WD. about 40 metre's in front of us. steep terrain. in the place where I have heard the tree knocks and seen the tree bends. travelling at a great speed -too fast to get a good look. TIME TO GET OUT OF THE FOREST!!!
How big was it?? Holy dooley! How fast do you reckon it was going? Was it on two legs? Sounds potentially life changing!
Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. Dr. Carl Sagan

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Tue Jul 10, 2018 12:09 pm

it was just before dark. we were traveling in the 4wd up a steep 4wd track. this brown thing was taller than the car. it came out from the area where the tepee structure and bones are across the track into the area where I heard the tree knocks - this area is very much like some sort of wallow. the brown thing was traveling at a great speed and was in view for 6 seconds or so. I could only see from hip level up because of the thick scrub. it moved smoothly and seemed to glide through the scrub with ease. we were so startled we did not get out of the vehicle. we turned around and headed for home.

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