Regional variations and environment - canines west of Dividing Range?

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Boab Bob
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Regional variations and environment - canines west of Dividing Range?

Unread post by Boab Bob » Tue Jun 26, 2018 8:36 am

Following on from my assumption that aborigine communities may have displaced the yowies downstream on the Murray river to the Adelaide and Flinder Ranges i wondered if there were regional traits and indeed whether the yowies may have been pushed to higher ground and we are incorrectly assuming that one environment type or another is the natural yowie habitat. Some of the early accounts have it as living on the east and west slopes of the Blue Mountains etc and the Megalong Valley encounter and one in South Australia both have canines. Is it a trait of males only? Young males or they grow with age?

Why do some yowie seem to need to pull themselves through woodland whereas some have no problem running at full pelt or walking like a human out in the open? Old habits die hard?

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Hominidhunter
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Re: Regional variations and environment - canines west of Dividing Range?

Unread post by Hominidhunter » Thu Jul 26, 2018 7:52 pm

Hi Bob, I’ve always thought that they lived in very isolated pockets in the most remote places of the great dividing range to simply be far away from their biggest competition for food, the aboriginal, now that the aboriginal is no longer in the bush, and the older ones that kept them from encroaching into aboriginal territory have since passed, a new generation have left their habitat to make good of new pasture, so to speak, could be why we are seeing them more often, but as far as features go, I’d say it’s more an age thing, also, to those who say that Australia can’t support a great ape, then how did it ever support the aboriginal people with an even more limited diet than an opertunistc predator.

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