Could MEG have survived?

A topic for sightings and tales regarding all water based creatures from Australia and the World.
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Searcher
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Could MEG have survived?

Unread post by Searcher » Mon Feb 18, 2019 10:20 am

There's always plenty of UFO reports. An average 600 per month are processed by MUFON. New Yowie and Bigfoot encounters come to light quite regularly. However, giant shark reports are extremely rare and historical accounts are usually the only way of judging whether enormous sharks could still roam the world's oceans.
https://exemplore.com/cryptids/Is-the-M ... till-Alive

Yowie bait
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Re: Could MEG have survived?

Unread post by Yowie bait » Thu Feb 28, 2019 5:21 pm

Thanks Searcher. Great article there. I voted "yes"!
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Yowiechow
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Re: Could MEG have survived?

Unread post by Yowiechow » Thu Jun 06, 2019 4:22 pm

I'm going to say no. Megalodons were coastal predators that required large mammalian prey to survive. If they were alive, we'd frequently be witnessing them attacking whales and seals, scavenging on whale carcasses (like modern sharks do) and checking out boats (again like modern sharks, who are very curious animals). Also we'd see them coming into conflict with Orcas. One of the theories posited for Megalodons decline and extinction is competition from Orca ancestors. There would literally be no scientifically plausible reason for a Megalodon to become a deep sea shark, if it did start living in trenches and the like, it would have evolved to become smaller and far more adapted and probably look more like a goblin shark than anything else.

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Re: Could MEG have survived?

Unread post by Searcher » Wed Aug 14, 2019 11:30 am

Not a Megalodon, but almost as fascinating!

A huge shark that lives in the freezing waters of the North Atlantic and Arctic oceans has been identified by scientists as the world's oldest living vertebrate.

Nature Journal reports that scientists have concluded that the Greenland shark has a lifespan of at least 272 years.

Read about it here: https://www.9news.com.au/world/greenlan ... 0ab5e29f47

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