tree bending

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missm4mi

tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Thu May 31, 2018 10:34 pm

seen 5 more bent trees/saplings today which were not there two days ago. this one is higher than the reach of any human.
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ChrisV
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Re: tree bending

Unread post by ChrisV » Mon Jun 04, 2018 1:07 pm

Wow!
Now what could possibly cause that type of bending?
Thats really interesting.

No human hands could do that.

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Mon Jun 04, 2018 8:05 pm

I have no idea what's causing the tree bending. went for a walk today and seen 4 more trees newly bent. the tree top of this tree was bent right over touching the ground. and it's not humans. I
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missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Wed Jun 06, 2018 5:09 pm

today found more tree bending that wasn't there two days ago. this was virtually 30 metre's plus above a steep gully/ravine. no person could of done this. totally not possible.
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Yowie bait
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Re: tree bending

Unread post by Yowie bait » Wed Jun 06, 2018 6:39 pm

Thats some great tree bends. Ive seen small ones but nothing like that! They certainly stand out from the rest of the trees. Thanks for sharing! (thumb up)
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Re: tree bending

Unread post by Whip » Wed Jun 06, 2018 7:44 pm

Really interesting pics there! As far as how, I wonder if it is just purely a fun thing to do? Pick the right tree, shimmy up until your sheer weight makes it bend and then move along toward the top. Any correlation of direction with the bends?

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by Yowiechow » Wed Jun 06, 2018 9:56 pm

Treebends are clearly a yowies attempt to make a koala catapault.

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by inthedark » Thu Jun 07, 2018 11:34 am

Yowiechow wrote:
Wed Jun 06, 2018 9:56 pm
Treebends are clearly a yowies attempt to make a koala catapault.
(claps hands)

Meantime, these bends .. when not clearly done by 'kids' (aka, adults having fun in the forest), are what can happen when a sapling grows too tall too fast .. usually as a result of pressures for sunlight. A good rain, or even just a bit of wind, pushes them past the point of return and that's it. Doomed to grow into an arc, if they don't die. They don't snap, simply because they are young and green wood.

Since we can actually observe this happening in any patch of forest .. even those in the middle of cities and surrounded by humanity .. it's fairly safe to assume that the same thing is happening in remote areas.

As much as it would be cool to think BF/Y is running around green spaces, bending trees :)

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by gregvalentine » Thu Jun 07, 2018 4:30 pm

inthedark wrote:
Thu Jun 07, 2018 11:34 am
Yowiechow wrote:
Wed Jun 06, 2018 9:56 pm
Treebends are clearly a yowies attempt to make a koala catapault.
(claps hands)

Meantime, these bends .. when not clearly done by 'kids' (aka, adults having fun in the forest), are what can happen when a sapling grows too tall too fast .. usually as a result of pressures for sunlight. A good rain, or even just a bit of wind, pushes them past the point of return and that's it. Doomed to grow into an arc, if they don't die. They don't snap, simply because they are young and green wood.

Since we can actually observe this happening in any patch of forest .. even those in the middle of cities and surrounded by humanity .. it's fairly safe to assume that the same thing is happening in remote areas.

As much as it would be cool to think BF/Y is running around green spaces, bending trees :)
You forget that Drop Bears can grow to a pretty large size also . . .
Could be them (joke), humans or might indicate yowies as suggested.

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:04 pm

and where are your photos of anything interesting??? so much ASSuming going on here (claps)

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Thu Jun 07, 2018 10:04 pm

if I wanted comedy:

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by inthedark » Fri Jun 08, 2018 1:19 pm

gregvalentine wrote:
Thu Jun 07, 2018 4:30 pm

You forget that Drop Bears can grow to a pretty large size also . . .
Could be them (joke), humans or might indicate yowies as suggested.
Drop bears .. that's what it is (woot)

Seriously though, it's frustrating to see clever and motivated people put effort put into things like this. Since all of these structures - rock stacks, tree bends etc can be human built and/or a result of weather, it seems a fruitless enterprise to pursue them. If we can't tell the difference between a teepee built by people, and a teepee built by BF/Y .. then we can learn nothing useful from it.

It seems to me to be a problem in the field .. a distraction from the important work of collecting empirical evidence. I really really want to see more people taking a scientific approach to this matter, obviously. Chasing the big and dramatic phantoms (teepees, etc) appears to be at the expense of the tiny piece of hair, or single gram of fecal matter. For example, how many of these American researchers, filming and documenting 'structures' all over the nation, are actually taking samples from them? Or from all those 'footprints' they find? I ask myself why they are not doing so, and can only come to two possible conclusions: a) they don't have the expertise or the money (testing is expensive), or b) they know it won't produce anything, and will lose them YT views. I really hope it's the former, but fear it's more likely the latter.

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by inthedark » Fri Jun 08, 2018 1:21 pm

missm4mi wrote:
Thu Jun 07, 2018 10:04 pm
if I wanted comedy:
I love Peter Caine!

The guy is hilarious, and an excellent troll (pure_evil)

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by inthedark » Fri Jun 08, 2018 1:23 pm

missm4mi wrote:
Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:04 pm
and where are your photos of anything interesting??? so much ASSuming going on here (claps)
Not sure who you're addressing. If myself, then I could post (if I knew how) a bunch of photos of 'odd' things in the forest, plus some footprints. I've even posted coordinates of an 'oddity' (aka, shadow) on a google earth image.

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Sat Jun 09, 2018 9:04 pm

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missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Sat Jun 09, 2018 9:06 pm

missm4mi wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 12:21 am
if you have photos of unusual finds - do put them up as it is very interesting. I am only equipped with my phone camera so trying to get the perfect picture isn't always easy and doesn't really portray what I am viewing first hand.

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by Simon M » Sun Jun 10, 2018 4:31 am

inthedark wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 1:19 pm

Seriously though, it's frustrating to see clever and motivated people put effort put into things like this. Since all of these structures - rock stacks, tree bends etc can be human built and/or a result of weather, it seems a fruitless enterprise to pursue them. If we can't tell the difference between a teepee built by people, and a teepee built by BF/Y .. then we can learn nothing useful from it.

It seems to me to be a problem in the field .. a distraction from the important work of collecting empirical evidence. I really really want to see more people taking a scientific approach to this matter, obviously. Chasing the big and dramatic phantoms (teepees, etc) appears to be at the expense of the tiny piece of hair, or single gram of fecal matter. For example, how many of these American researchers, filming and documenting 'structures' all over the nation, are actually taking samples from them? Or from all those 'footprints' they find? I ask myself why they are not doing so, and can only come to two possible conclusions: a) they don't have the expertise or the money (testing is expensive), or b) they know it won't produce anything, and will lose them YT views. I really hope it's the former, but fear it's more likely the latter.
I agree with this post. I think too many people - especially on YouTube - use this whole topic as a way to grab their fifteen minutes of fame, and aren't serious about it at all.

It's only by gathering physical evidence that anything useful will be learned. There's no way of knowing what tiny bit of info might produce something important.

I think it's become a bit like the online version of prank phone calls back in the 'olden days'. People produce a video hoping to get the most clicks/likes/whatever. Too many people don't really want answers to questions, they simply want an audience.

The term "gone viral" is a telling one. A virus can spread really quickly, but we know it doesn't do its victims any favours.

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by yowiedan » Sun Jun 10, 2018 12:58 pm

After doing some research on tree bends there are a few factors that make trees bend including dehydration. We have all seen flowers and leaves wilt in the summer months, and this can happen to some types of trees which have more flexible trunks than others. So they bend down with the appearance that something or someone has been there to grab it and pull it down to look like that. Also the cold can affect trees, some nights during winter can become so cold that they actually dehydrate the tree and if the winter is a dry one it adds to this result as well. Other things like parasites and termites and wood ants can cause this as well. We need to not just take a picture but check all over the tree from base to tip to look for what may have resulted in each tree bend.

Ps Yowie cannot be blamed for every tree bend. But some tree bends or tree breaks make you wonder????

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by Simon M » Mon Jun 11, 2018 4:36 pm

I reckon Yowie behaviour - as described by numerous witnesses - indicates they'd be extremely subtle about what kinds of indications they'd leave to announce their presence. I'm not sure they'd so anything too obvious, as their total avoidance of us seems to be one of their paramount survival strategies. It seems possible they'd leave indications only another of their kind would be likely to notice. Unless it's an act of desperation, they don't want us even knowing they're around. Just my two cent's worth.

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by Simon M » Mon Jun 11, 2018 4:36 pm

* I meant "do anything too obvious".

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Mon Jun 11, 2018 8:28 pm

thank you all for your comments, ideas and opinions. found some more bends today (3 more). the area I am finding all these unusual "signs" is on top of the mountain ridge in a corridor of thick dry forest. to the south of this area, the toowoomba second range crossing project is currently underway. lots of land cleared and heavy machine activity for the last two years. to the north of this area more land is currently being cleared and logged. Another walk in this central dry forest corridor on the opposite mountain ridge I am finding NO tree bends. however there are bones of kangaroos, sheep, goats and cattle literally everywhere. here are some photos from this afternoons walk:
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Re: tree bending

Unread post by Yowiechow » Mon Jun 11, 2018 11:37 pm

As other posters have said there could be any number of reasons for bent trees, it's very common for sapling trees to just grow crooked. How would a yowie tell the difference between a naturally bent sapling and one that has been bent by another yowie? Animals generally want to avoid confrontation and use very clear signals to indicate territory. Relying on a something like a bent tree in a forest that could have a lot of bent trees from natural causes is not a good way to demarcate your borders and would most likely lead to a lot of fights. It's more likely that Yowies and other hominids rely on scent markings to mark their borders. There would be no misunderstanding the scent of another male yowie.

It's kinda the same deal with rock stacks. It's pretty common for hikers or bushwalkers to leave rock stacks. Sometimes it's to mark a trail, sometimes it's just for fun with the idea being that subsequent hikers will add to the pile. If you could get to this place to photograph the rock stack it's not implausible to think that a bushwalker could have got there to actually make the rock stack.

It's great that you're getting out there. I just think that researchers need to be really scientific and logical in their approach to yowiehunting. I think it hurts the subject when we accept every bent tree or possibly man made rock stack as evidence for the existence of yowies.


The animal bones sound interesting though. Did you take any pictures of those? If you can get your hand on some bones you could send them off to be analysed and see if there is any evidence of predation. Are there any reports of missing live stock from the area?

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:35 am

I walk for relaxation. not looking for Yowie. (in fact I never want to see one to be honest). I take photo's of unusual things I see while walking. things that make me think - "what the"!!! ... The rock stack is interesting I picked up the top rock and noticed it interlocked perfectly into the next rock - like Lego blocks. in the area all the rocks were light coloured like the bottom one. no dark rocks around there like the top three. so the dark rocks were brought to that spot. if I was going to make a rock stack I would be going more than four high and I wouldn't spend the time to carefully interlock the rocks to a perfect fit like the pictures stack. the walking trail starts after some serious km's of 4wd to reach the mountain ridge which is elevated high above the valley.

I am not sure when I will walk the next mountain ridge where the bones are. feel a bit creeped out in that place. bones scattered everywhere. not a good feeling in that place at all. 😨

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:44 am

also YES to the missing livestock question. one neighbour missing goats and sheep - two of them were dragged into that neighbour's deep dam and drowned. and another neighbour missing sheep.

missm4mi

Re: tree bending

Unread post by missm4mi » Tue Jun 12, 2018 3:18 am

if you go down in the woods today
you better not go alone!!!
it's lovely down in the woods today
but safer to stay at home!!!

they got that right!!! starting to feel this way!!!
time to find a safer walking place.

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by Yowie bait » Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:00 am

missm4mi wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 3:18 am
if you go down in the woods today
you better not go alone!!!
it's lovely down in the woods today
but safer to stay at home!!!

they got that right!!! starting to feel this way!!!
time to find a safer walking place.
If you feel uncomfortable then maybe trust your instinct and dont walk there. Does look nice from the photos! (thumb up)
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Re: tree bending

Unread post by Yowie bait » Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:06 am

For those saying the saplings grow that way then shouldnt be too hard to prove with some time lapse footage or a link to where you got the info from. I think yowiedan has some details in an issue of yowietimes?

Still doesnt totally rule out yowies bending them, especially near water though and rock stacks either. How can we know 100% ether way?

Comparing to common animals is an assumption as well. They seem to be men like us..only vastly superior in some ways.. (scared)
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Re: tree bending

Unread post by inthedark » Tue Jun 12, 2018 1:51 pm

Yowie bait wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:06 am
For those saying the saplings grow that way then shouldnt be too hard to prove with some time lapse footage or a link to where you got the info from. I think yowiedan has some details in an issue of yowietimes?

Still doesnt totally rule out yowies bending them, especially near water though and rock stacks either. How can we know 100% ether way?

Comparing to common animals is an assumption as well. They seem to be men like us..only vastly superior in some ways.. (scared)
I've seen trees in my backyard do the bend thing. Not quite time lapse footage, but daily observance over a period of time :)

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by inthedark » Tue Jun 12, 2018 2:00 pm

missm4mi wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:44 am
also YES to the missing livestock question. one neighbour missing goats and sheep - two of them were dragged into that neighbour's deep dam and drowned. and another neighbour missing sheep.
How was the neighbour able to determine that they'd been dragged and drowned?

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Re: tree bending

Unread post by inthedark » Tue Jun 12, 2018 2:11 pm

Simon M wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 4:31 am


I agree with this post. I think too many people - especially on YouTube - use this whole topic as a way to grab their fifteen minutes of fame, and aren't serious about it at all.

It's only by gathering physical evidence that anything useful will be learned. There's no way of knowing what tiny bit of info might produce something important.

I think it's become a bit like the online version of prank phone calls back in the 'olden days'. People produce a video hoping to get the most clicks/likes/whatever. Too many people don't really want answers to questions, they simply want an audience.

The term "gone viral" is a telling one. A virus can spread really quickly, but we know it doesn't do its victims any favours.
I suspect most of the American YT folk are in it for the revenue, because they spend all their time filming and talking sticks, and zero time collecting evidence. They CLEARLY don't want close scrutiny of the 'game'. It's a shame, but understandable. People determined to make a living via YT will find a topic which pays, and run with it. That's how it works. Very few are genuine, though I will take a minute here to take my hat off to one of the greatest (and likely soon to be one of the richest) Youtubers on planet earth .. Primitive Technology. Australian, and dead genuine - at least initially. Coincidentally, he spends most of his time deep in the northern forest. I wonder if he's seen our hairy buddy? But I digress ....

My point was that, to me, Australian researchers are far more believable and trustworthy. Since few ever clock up much in the way of YT traffic, they are clearly motivated by something else. Whether that something else actually leads to good research methods is another question, but at least their passion and interest is legitimate.

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