Possible Nimbinjee sighting

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Hairy Kiwi
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Possible Nimbinjee sighting

Unread post by Hairy Kiwi » Thu Mar 04, 2021 11:18 am

Thought I would put a link to this article up.
https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/weird- ... e-23542756
Excerpt

"A 'little hairy man' was heard calling out to a pal before jumping on the roof of a family home, a biologist claims.

Wildlife expert and lecturer Gary Opit believes his daughter came face to face with a gibbon-like creature on December 20 last year in Nimbin, New South Wales, Australia.

But as an expert in zoology, Gary dismissed the sighting as any known ape because they do not live in the area.

Gary said: "Our daughter and her partner when staying with us over Christmas saw a Nimbinjee or little hairy man jump up onto our roof at 2am and from their description was exactly like a gibbon in all respects."

Really just an FYI but may trigger some thoughts in others brains as to other similar sightings in the area.

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sensesonfire
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Re: Possible Nimbinjee sighting

Unread post by sensesonfire » Thu Mar 04, 2021 12:14 pm

Hairy Kiwi wrote:
Thu Mar 04, 2021 11:18 am
Wildlife expert and lecturer Gary Opit believes his daughter came face to face with a gibbon-like creature on December 20 last year in Nimbin, New South Wales, Australia.

But as an expert in zoology, Gary dismissed the sighting as any known ape because they do not live in the area.
Hi Hairy Kiwi,

I'm with Gary on this one it is definitely not a gibbon but interestingly the image of the prints that Gary believes to belong to a Nimbinjee show what appears to be four toes and no heel.

When a gibbon lands it does so on its toes.
And there are more differences between the gibbon and human walking patterns at the end of a stride. Instead of lifting the foot as one long lever, the gibbon lifted its heel first, effectively bending the foot in two to form an upward-turned arch, stretching the toes' tendons even further and storing more elastic energy ready for release as the foot eventually pushes off.

And this is what these prints seem to show using the toes to push forward.
The human mind is only constrained by the barricades we build around it.

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